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General Assembly announces calendar changes

Still sine die on April 15th, though.

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Legislative leadership announced Wednesday, which is day 50 of the 60-day regular session of the 2024 General Assembly, they have made a series of adjustments in the meeting schedule for the remaining days of the session.

While lawmakers will meet as usual on Thursday and Friday of this week, several changes will take place between now and April 15, the final day.

Under those changes, days 53 and 54 have been moved from March 19 and 20 to March 21 and 22. March 19 and 20 have been changed to committee meeting days, which will not count against the 60-day limit contained in the Kentucky Constitution for regular sessions in even-numbered years.

In addition, session days 55 and 56 have been moved from March 21 and 22 to March 25 and 26, again to stay within the 60-day restriction.

For the rest of the session, the two days that are set aside for the House and Senate to concur on bills, March 27 and 28, will remain the same, as will the veto recess days which run from March 29 through April 9.

The veto recess is because the governor has 10 business days to sign, veto, or allow bills to become law without his signature. The recess gives lawmakers a chance to return to Frankfort and take votes to override the gubernatorial vetoes, and the calendar will set two days aside for that purpose at the end of the session.

Those final two session days, 59 and 60, will also remain the same, April 14 and 15, at which point lawmakers will adjourn “sine die,” the official name for the end of the session.

Note that any other bills passed during those final days can be vetoed by the Governor, without a chance for an override vote, since the General Assembly has already adjourned.

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Written by Tom Latek. Cross-posted from Kentucky Today.



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Kentucky Today is a news and commentary site sponsored by the Kentucky Baptist Convention.

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