Interview with Emily Bingham, a primary preview, and Louisville’s budget

An episode of “My Old Kentucky Podcast”

Robert Kahne Jazmin Smith
Robert Kahne / Jazmin Smith

This week we welcomed author and historian Emily Bingham to the show to talk about her new book, My Old Kentucky Home: The Astonishing Life and Reckoning of an Iconic American Song. She talked to us about what she hoped to communicate through her book, what she meant in her conclusion, and how she approached writing a book about racism as a white person. It's a great conversation!

Early voting begins on May 12th, and primary election day is May 17th (next Tuesday), so we did a primary preview of key races for state legislature, U.S. Congress, major mayoral races, LFUCG and Metro Council Seats, and even more! In addition, we talked about Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer's final proposed budget and his final vision for Louisville as mayor.

Dr. Bingham asked that we present the full lyrics of My Old Kentucky Home in the show notes so that people can better understand the conversation she hopes the book sparks. They are below -- be aware that they make use of a term for Black people which many consider a slur. You can listen to a version with the full lyrics here.

The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home,
'Tis summer, the darkies are gay;
The corn-top's ripe and the meadow's in the bloom,
While the birds make music all the day.
The young folks roll on the little cabin floor,
All merry, all happy and bright;
By 'n' by Hard Times comes a-knocking at the door,
Then my old Kentucky home, goodnight.

Weep no more my lady
Oh! weep no more today!
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
For the Old Kentucky Home far away

They hunt no more for the possum and the coon,
On meadow, the hill and the shore,
They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
On the bench by the old cabin door.
The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
With sorrow, where all was delight,
The time has come when the darkies have to part,
Then my old Kentucky home, goodnight.

Weep no more my lady
Oh! weep no more today!
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
For the Old Kentucky Home far away

The head must bow and the back will have to bend,
Wherever the darky may go;
A few more days, and the trouble all will end,
In the field where the sugar-canes grow.
A few more days for to tote the weary load,
No matter, 'twill never be light;
A few more days till we totter on the road,
Then my old Kentucky home, goodnight.

Weep no more my lady
Oh! weep no more today!
We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
For the Old Kentucky Home far away.

--30--

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Robert Kahne

Robert is a graduate of UK's Martin School for Public Policy. He works as a data scientist in Louisville, where he lives w/ wife Kelsey and their daughter. (Read the rest on the Contributors page.)

Jazmin Smith

Jazmin holds a J.D. from the UK College of Law and is now a public defender in Louisville. She is also a member of the Louisville Bar Association. (Read the rest on the Contributors page.)


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