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Politics News and Notes for Wednesday

News stories you may have missed from across the political landscape.

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‘The cost of doing nothing is much higher’: Big Three auto workers prepare to strike

Two days before their contract expires at midnight Thursday, the Auto Workers (UAW) are poised to strike the Big 3 automakers—General Motors, Ford, and Stellantis—to recoup concessions made over the past two decades, end tiers, boost wages, and fight for a shorter workweek and other quality-of-life demands.

UAW President Shawn Fain was elected in March on a slate backed by the reform movement Unite All Workers for Democracy (UAWD), on a platform of “no corruption, no concessions, no tiers,” ending nearly 80 years of one-party rule in the union. The reform slate won every seat it contested and came into office with a mandate to take the union in a more militant direction, similar to the leadership shakeup in the Teamsters in 2021. (Labor Notes)

Beshear attacks Cameron over abortion restrictions in Kentucky’s race for governor

Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear began airing a new ad last week attacking GOP challenger Daniel Cameron for supporting Kentucky’s near-total ban on abortion.It’s a change in strategy for the incumbent, and many Democratic politicians in the South, who have avoided going on the offensive over abortion rights. (LPM News)

Ahead of Kentucky elections, initiatives to bolster immigrant political participation take shape

For some residents born outside the United States, political participation isn't always a straightforward process. Community advocates in Louisville are working to engage and help immigrants harness their voting power. (LPM News)

Bank economists: “Soft landing” likely but economy still faces risks

Despite an expected loss of momentum in U.S. economic growth over the next few quarters, the U.S. economy is likely to dodge a recession, according to the latest forecast of the American Bankers Association’s Economic Advisory Committee.

The committee, composed of 14 chief economists from some of North America’s largest banks, sees real economic growth slowing from 2.1% annualized during the first three quarters of 2023 to less than 1.0% annualized over the following three quarters. Momentum then improves slightly in the latter part of 2024, although the pace of activity remains below potential, according to the committee. (Lane Report)

GOP may force government shutdown over abortion and gender-affirming care

When the U.S. House of Representatives joins the Senate back in Washington this week, both chambers will be racing to complete the annual government-funding process and avoid a shutdown at the end of September. Among the major sticking points are proposals offered by House Republicans that aim to restrict access to abortion and gender-affirming care. (19th News)

Kentucky, Tennessee bans on gender affirming care to remain in place during appeal

The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals denied another request to block Kentucky and Tennessee bans on gender-affirming care for minors while the court reviews a legal challenge to the laws. A final decision in the case is expected later this month. (LPM News)

Ky. Supreme Court Chief Justice Laurance VanMeter won’t run for reelection next year

Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice Laurance B. VanMeter announced he will not seek reelection next year. He has served in the high court’s top spot since January. (LPM News)

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